Betrayal

We come to the end of our series on the disciples this week. So far, we have covered the 11 faithful disciples of Jesus. The final disciple in every list is notorious Judas. His name is synonymous with the word traitor or betrayal. Few people name their children Judas these days. He pretty much ruined a good name. The name Judas means Jehovah leads. Rather, Judas Iscariot was led by the evil one to commit the most grievous act in all of history.

It has been a challenge to keep this sermon a reasonable length. There is much to say about Judas. First, the Old Testament predicts his betrayal. We could spend a good deal of time talking about this. Secondly, Jesus has much to say about the gravity of his act. We could highlight these references about his betrayal. There are multiple glimpses of Judas in the gospel accounts. We could look through these accounts to discover more about Judas. Judas is a model of Satan’s destructive influence and can serve as a reminder to us all that the evil one desires to use us for his purposes. Once he is done, he will gladly discard us as recked and ruined people. We could talk about this dynamic in our lives. It is hard to contain the content to the general length of a Sunday morning sermon.

Join us on Sunday as we explore Judas Iscariot. While his story is unfortunate, it reminds us of evil in our world. All of the disciples had shortcomings and inadequacies. Yet Judas fails to repent and allow Jesus to transform him. Instead, he chose to reject Jesus’ way and attempted to subvert the kingdom of God.

(Mark 14:21 NIV) But woe to that man who betrays the Son of Man! It would be better for him if he had not been born.