Change

John Lasseter of Pixar Studios was being interviewed by Michelle Norris on National Public Radio. He was discussing the work of computer animation. Norris expressed her impression of the work.

The cars glisten . . . It looks like we’re seeing photography

She then questioned Lasseter,

With everything you can do with computer generated animation, are there still limitations?

Lassester affirmed the limitations, explaining the challenge.

The more organic something is in the way it looks or the way it moves, the harder it is to create it with a computer.

He went on to explain that every frame of a movie takes about seventeen hours. According to the Los Angeles Times, production costs for Pixar films average about $140 million.

At the same time, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden announced a summer exhibit in which they took super close photos of tree bark. There was very little cost involved. The exhibit was described in these terms.

One canvas is magenta red has curling squares of what looked like skin or material; another has furry brown hairs sprouting on green and orange stripes; and on a third, lip-like shapes float on a gray-white background.

The contrasting of man-made verses organic/natural reminds us of what Dr. Lewis Foster observed many years ago. He relates,

The closer one gets to something man has made, the more its imperfections are obvious. The more we magnify something God has created, the more we see its perfection.

This week, we begin a sermon series through the book of Genesis. We open our Bibles to Genesis 1, the story of Creation. The natural world is truly a work of art. Its complex and exquisite details are overwhelming; the vastness of the universe is overwhelming. But how did it all begin? We will walk through the first six days of Creation according to Genesis. As we engage the text, we discover our role as created beings made in God’s image.